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that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
the first thing you do in j.a.g. school, you have a discussion about the difference between the law of war and criminal law. and every military lawyer is taught from the very beginning of their career that law of war detention is designed to neutralize the enemy and to gather intelligence about the enemy. there is a reason that when we capture somebody in a war, we don't give them a trial by jury, we don't give them a lawyer. we have got 3,000 people in american military custody in afghanistan that were captured on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were
. smith: mr. speaker, h.r. 6620, the former presidents protection act of 2012, amends federal law to uniformerly provide lifetime secret service protection to all of america's former presidents. i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, for sponsoring this commonsense bipartisan legislation. america has a responsibility to protect its presidents and its families and not simply while they serve in office. we also have a duty to ensure the ongoing safety of those who serve in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed
, the health care law may face in the coming days and in the coming years with julie rovner of n.p.r., and we'll be right back. >> program under began under tugwell who was one of the advisers to president franklin roosevelt. to document the conditions under which people were living, this was back when we didn't have television. we had radio, but a lot of places didn't have electricity so they couldn't listen to the radio broadcast to find out what was going on in parts of the country. royce striker, who was an economist from columbia university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they sent film to roy striker to have his photographers try out, to see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, a new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 40's comes to life through the eye of the camera as they share some of the 1,600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sundays at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern. part of amer
of employees he has to less than 50 so he won't be subject to penalties under the 2010 health law. so right now the federal government is keeping him from offering jobs. that hurts the people who need jobs and who would be happy to be on a payroll where they would be putting their own contributions into social security and medicare. increasing taxes means less growth and fewer jobs, and that's not balanced. three years ago i made a pledge to oppose tax increases. i made that pledge to the citizens i serve and to no one else, and i made it because tax increases will hurt them. when jen, the owner of la petite cuisine in new york says the best thing i can do is give her a break from high taxes, i believe her. i ran for congress to help jen and all the small business people like her who are the engines of job creation. i ran for congress to help all the people who need employers like jen to hire them. these good people deserve better than temporary fixes. they deserve a plan that solves our economic problems for the long term. they deserve a plan that goes beyond politics and shows a commitment to
gupta, a law and mba student at george washington university, died suddenly. mysteriously. he's no relationship to me, but when his family got word, they spent hours trading phone calls. they were in stunned disbelief. >> there was a message from his mom, and she had left three messages for me so i knew there was something wrong. >> i received a call from my mom. i didn't answer, but then i got a text message from her, which is very unusual. >> and i called her back. and i said, what happened? and she says, it's ben. he died. i just -- i didn't have any of the information. >> i finally said, how did this happen? and she said he went to sleep the night before and he just never woke up. >> he's always smiling, every picture he's smiling. >> for days, ben gupta's family was desperate for answers. what killed him? he was only 28 years old. he had recently been given a clean bill of health. how could he just not wake up? >> and then the thought went through my mind that maybe it was some sort of a brain aneurism or something must have happened. >> but his father was in for a shock
that the seattle law is consistent with the first amendment. and, colleagues, i also want to mention that i'm still committed to finding policies that reduce yellow page blight and i'm working with the city attorney to hopefully draft new legislation to find alternate approaches to achieving the same goal. at this time, colleague, i hope you will be able to support this legislation in light of the 9th circuit. >> thank you. thank you, president chiu. supervisor wiener. >> i thank you and i want to thank president chiu for having pursued this legislation which i was happy to support and i was really saddened by the ninth slur circuit ruling. it seems that our federal courts more and more are fetishizing commercial and corporate speech. i fundamentally disagree with that. with that said, the current law is what it is and i will be reluctantly supporting this suspension and hope to revive legislation in the not too distant future. >> thank you. let's open this up for public comment. is there anyone from the public that would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. so, r colleagues, there
breathes life to challenge of the healthcare law. that is coming up. arizona governor jan brewer facing another lawsuit. we will tell you who is suing and why next. [ whistle blows ] hi victor! mom? i know you got to go in a minute but this is a real quick me, that's perfect for two! campbell's chunky beef with country vegetables, poured over rice! [ male announcer ] campbell's chunky soup. it fills you up right. but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. so now's the time. when i take a pi
of marriage act passed in 1996 by congress, signed into law by president clinton. and what it says is that for federal law purposes, marriage can exist only between a man and a woman. so that means this in the nine states where same sex marriage is legal, if a same sex couple gets married there, they're considered mayrried for state lw but not federal law and the practical consequence is they are denied about 1,000 federal benefits, tax benefits, survivors benefits, to be covered under health insurance. that sort of thing. it will have to decide whether that law is unconstitutional discrimination, denying those couples equal treatment. what the advocates of overturning it say is never before has the federal government done anything but defer to a state's definition of what a legal marriage is. now the second big issue is california's proposition 8. this was the ballot proposition passed, overturned two years ago. what it says is that even though a california court said that marriage was legal in that state, it banned gay mrarnlg in california. now if the court grants that case, the
are reacting emotionally to this terrible crime in kansas city. but the problem america has is not law abiding citizens possessing weapons. that's not damaging the nation. crimes committed with handguns and out-of-control people that's what's hurting the u.s.a. you will never stop crimes of madness, you are never going to stop them like the kansas city situation. you can put violent criminals away for a long time if they use a gun during the commission of a crime. and that should be done. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight reaction. joining us from washington mary catherine ham and juan williams from washington. where am i going wrong, juan. >> you said people feel more secure if they are able to own a gun. i have got to say first off the bat, bill. i think you are exactly right about everybody's right to have a gun the supreme court has reaffirmed it. i differ about my understanding what the founding fathers wrote. i think they were writing about a militia. the court sides with bill o'reilly or bill o'reilly sides with the court. we have some guns in this country right now and whe
to cut spending and, i believe, it's super flowous. >> and that is a law, higher rates to go up for the 2072%, including all of you. yes. >> reporter: president obama was speaking to business leaders when he made the comment. he insists he will veto any bill not including tax increases on wealthier americans. >>> the defense department started planning for the roughly $500 billion in personnel cuts. the pin is not talking to the defense contractors of public plans. >>> the council made it clear that it's not following the mayor's lead on several issues. it was evident last night during a 13-hour meeting. the council voted against several bills. matt has more. >> reporter: the mayor appears to be concerned about the budget when it comes to a number of bills passed by the council yesterday and one thing that could put a hole is the plan by the council to lower speed camera fines. it passed last night and even though the mayor said the cameras are about safety, not mean, they generate a lot -- not money, they generate a lot of revenue and they could be close to $100 million the nex
above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, ambassador rice went on the sunday talk shows and said u.s. officials believed it was a spontaneous reaction to protest over an anti-islam video. not a preplanned terrorist attack. first the controversy was over wheth
on taxes, anything that sounds like they will be rewarded for breaking the law and they will get an easy past is considered amnesty. jon: ronald reagan did it, didn't he? >> yes. republicans are a natural homss, they believe, for latinos. they are the party of opportunity, and hard work, of entrepreneurs and they are pro family. they have to start to speak about these issues where it doesn't sound like they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >>
healthcare. >>> i know some people want me to bypass congress and change the laws on my own. believe me -- [ applause ] and believe me, right now dealing with congress, the id idea -- >> that was a tough one. that was the president getting heckled last year. this summer those dreamers had their demands met, at least in part with the deferred action for childhood arrivals ordered by president obama. so far, 310,000 young people have applied. that action may in fact have bore fruit for the president on election night when he took home 71% of the latino vote. yet, no comprehensive reform had been attempted by the obama add mrpgs. many are still looking to the president for leadership on the issue. back with my panel. i'm interested in this because this is a moment on the one hand they're heckling, but the next moment they do basically what i have to read from a page in the republican handbook, they hand to him a policy. they're like here, do this. and sure enough, he does it. we end up with deferred action. >> right. >> is that the model for how we're going to get immigration reform done s
requirements. under current law, financial institutions are required to provide annual privacy is notices that the explain their practices. they are required to mail those notices regardless of whether or not that information sharing practice has changed. these annual mailings cost millions each year and do not provide the consumers with new information if the practice hasn't change thsmed will require an institution to provide annual privacy notices only if they have changed their privacy rules. this will eliminate an unnecessary burden for our financial institutions. i would like to thank mr. luetkemeyer and mr. sherman for their leadership on this issue and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. sherman: i thank the gentlelady from west virginia for yielding to me and i yield myself such time as i may consume in support of h.r. 5817, the eliminate privacy notify -- notice confusion act. i want to thank representative luetkemeyer for his work in introducing this bill. i've enjoyed working with him on it. mr. -- ms. speak
driving law not only lets cops pull you over for texting while driving but also eating, reading the paper and putting on makeup. is that law appropriate? does it go too far? you can never cross the line in an e-mail to mcginty's mailbag, the address mailbag@wusa9.com or leave a comment on our facebook page. >>> still ahead topper is back with a look at the upcoming changes in our forecast. in fact, they've already gotten started, but first new york and new jersey not the only places still struggling to recover from hurricane sandy, a look at the superstorm's impact in part of maryland up next. >>> this is a 9 news fiscal cliff note. fact, if congress and the white house don't reach an agreement, your pay economic is going to go down. the reason? because the tax withholding in your paycheck will increase. here's the back story. the current payroll tax cut is set to expire december 31st. in dollars and cents this means your payroll tax withholding is going from 4.2% to 6.2%. now why is this happening? many of the policies expiring at the end of the year like the payroll tax cut and emergenc
as result of it they created a loan program that got me into college law school. we can't give up on that. this kid from east st. louis illinois and for many others, these loans make a big difference whether it's pell grants or loans, but let's look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid to education goes to for-profit schools. they have 12% of the students, 25% of the federal aid to education, and more than double the student loan default rate of any other class higher education. there are ways to cut back in spending in education particularly as is wasted on some of the schools that will give us opportunities for resources for real education. which can be part of our future. now let me come to the most painful topic of all, entitlements. social security was included in the simpson-bowles report but i didn't agree with every aspect of it, but i thought that was a sensible approach to breathing life into social security beyond its current longevity. i also like and it to 82 when asking your, and 83 and was told that social security is on its way out in six months, we'll be out of money.
immigration, illegal aliens who choose to break additional laws by stealing identities, dealing drugs, joining criminal gangs, driving without a license, or committing fraud must receive prompt justice and deportation. no ifs, ands, or buts. i'd say that was clear. he also -- he altered the virginia state seal for modesty. notice that woman is a bit more french than her display, but he says he wanted to make sure that bare breast was removed from the goddess of virtue. small point. when cuccinelli had lapel pins made, the goddess' breast was covered. small point. he discussed concerns about getting a social security number for a soon to be born child. he was wondering whether he should get a social security number because of concerns for black helicopters. let's listen. >> we're going to have ourself event child on monday if he's not born before. and for the very concerns you state, we're actually considering, as i'm sure many of you here didn't get a social security number when you were born. you had to do it now. we're considering not doing that. and a lot of people are considering that now
, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a law that these guys did not get paid. if i go to work and did not do my job, they will not pay me. they have not done their jobs in the years. they need to listen to the american people. we picked barack obama up for a reason because we like his policies. they need to get a clue. they are already struggling and having a hard time. if they do not get a clue, they will not be back there. host: republicans say the president and democrats are not making any good-faith offers, the same thing democrats say about republicans. how do we get them to move past with the speaker is calling a stalemate? caller: the people need to look at their actions, not what people are saying. these obstructionists' have locked down congress for years now. they are just continuing to do it. they refuse to admit to obama has a mandate to tax these rich people. just the other day the corporate income is up to 1175 trillion dollars. these corporations are sitting on this money. they sat on it all through the election to make obama look bad. i kn
he got the gun legally so he wasn't breaking laws being in possession of the firearm at a time. there is fall-out about this because people felt it was inappropriate for him to make the commentary. but he has done it before. >> eric: he editorializes usually on sports. but i saw this tragedy happen. saturday morning. and i saw it. how long before someone, someone uses that pulpit to say it's head drama and something else like gun control? never expected costas to do sunday on sunday night football. big stage. "god bless america" was playing in the background. we have a second amendment right in america to possess handguns. that gun or one of them was acquired legally. costas didn't even say he believes this. he said he agrees with whitlock's assessment of it. jason whitlock assessment of it. can you imagine if he was talking pro-life? the place would be uproar and shut it down. pull the plug on him. are you okay? >> bob: costas is right. the two people would be alive if it wasn't for that handgun in his hand. the culture of violence is out of control. if it was up to me, been a
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
bee" reports a federal judge is barring the state of california from enforcing its new law banning day conversion therapy. two mental health providers and a former patient are suing to overturn the ban. judge william shub ruling the first amendment rights of mental health professionals out-weigh concerns about the concerns of potential dangers associated with their practices. >>> a new orleans man has been fired from his job at a convenience store an he's facing a criminal citation if you can believe it police say he booted an ambulance that was responding to an emergency call for a man with chest pain. there is a sign at the store which warns that vehicles left unattended in the parking lot will be booted. the man claims he did not know the vehicle was an ambulance when he put the boot on it. it's clear to us that it is an ambulance. this guy is not from this country. he is telling police officers i had no idea this was an emergency vehicle. at least that is his excuse. this particular place enforces that you cannot be in there more than ten minutes without being booted. he was doing
his academic and health records, matters protected by federal privacy laws. the documents were requested by news organizations under a colorado freedom of information law. last month, holmes tried to injure himself by ramming his head into his jail cell wall. he was hospitalized with injuries that were called "not serious." a lot of those e-mails were blacked out so even we don't know what's in them at this point. now, there are two court hearings next week scheduled but this course has been delayed so far because of holmes' erratic behave skwror as to what happens next it's anyone's guess. >> pelley: barry, thank you. in egypt, president mohamed morsi has become a lightning rod for protests since he claimed near absolute power for himself. well, there were more violent demonstrations today over a proposed new constitution for egypt and holly williams is there. >> reporter: rival protesters clashed head on today outside cairo's presidential palace. president mubarak's opponents say -- president morsi's opponents say the knew constitution fails to protect basic rights, especiall
in america own firearms for lawful protection. you know, you talk about -- >> right, but there is, as you know -- >> -- you never cover self-defense cases that happen all over this country, too, and were in the newspaper. i have a stack of them right next to me here. those never get on your show. you only talk about the people who misuse the guns and never about the people like the 79-year-old grandmother in houston or the young mother in oklahoma who defended her 3 month old baby from intruders coming into her house. there is a good side and a bad side to guns and you focus only on the bad side. >> well, no, i don't, because statistically as you well know, the prevalence of gun incidents when people have guns in the home in a domestic sense where they go off accidentally or they take them against their partners or whatever it may be, is dramatically increased if you have guns in the property. obviously. >> that's not true for normal people. that is true for -- >> you made your point. let's go to josh horowitz to respond. >> well, i think one of the things that's very clear is that guns i
of islamic law as a source for many legislation. it places some constraint on the presidential power. limiting the president to two four-year terms and it provides for civilian oversight of the military. president morsi has vowed to give up the powers he assumed last week the started the protest, as soon as the constitution is ratified. he has 15 days to give it to referendum. >> this is critical until they draft the constitution and it goes to people to decide. >> opposition leaders are vowing to sleep in the square until morsi denounces his decree. >> despite the protests. egypt president has the broad public backing and members of the political party from the muslim brotherhood hold demonstrations in support of the president on saturday. bret? >> bret: steve harrigan live saturday in cairo. thanks. another day without internet and telephone service with people in war torn syria. they show the government war plane firing rockets on homs this week. video of spoke rising from the bomb strikes in other towns. north korea may be preparing for a rocket launch. sections are strucked in t
to break open the atm. >>> there is a renewed push in virginia tonight to change the laws when it comes to texting and driving. police need another reason to pull you over. texting while driving is a secondary offense. adam tuss explains how one local county is getting around the rules to hand out more tickets and stop the dangerous and growing problem. >> reporter: you don't have to be out on the roads long to see it. drivers texting. some even cruising down the interstate at high speeds. we saw this driver rolling along at 60 miles per hour today. he just kept rolling, and rolling, and about 20 seconds later put down the phone. here in fairfax county, police have been using a law called failure to pay full-time attention to pull over drivers who are texting, or are distracted behind the wheel. >> not a day goes by that people don't notice other drivers texting while driving. and our officers are doing what they can to enforce this. >> reporter: and she tells news4 these kinds of violations have skyrocketed. in 2009, about 7,000 offenses. in 2010, over 9,000. last year, and this year,
really heavy lifting jobs. it's different if you're working in a law firm and they keep you around for a few more years rather than you're driving a semi ray cross the country on route 70 or 80 all night long. you may not want a guy 730 years o -- 70 years old or a woman driving that truck. i really think you have to find something not -- i think the word hardship, not handicap, whether it be a hardship type role that are recognized as such where you get to retire sooner. i think we can deal with that over time but it takes more finesse. >> george will in his column today writes this, with a chip on his shoulder larger than -- >> i think will has a chip on his shoulder. >> -- barack obama is approaching his second term by replicating the m is stake of his first. now he seeks another surge of statism enlarging the portion of gross domestic product grasped by government and dispensed by politics. i guess that's how he describes keeping middle class tax cuts but while this may cause apoplexy among some republicans, isn't it time they realize that a majority of people voted for governm
nato is through continued development of democracy and the rule of law. there have been increasing pressure on the president to resign prior to the constitutional end of his term in october of 2013. while the new majority may see this as a logical next step to finalizing the transfer of power, attempting to have them give up their position -- the prosecutor's office arrested three officers of the government charged with unspecified abuses of power. georgia's made enormous power over the past two months. progress which very few predicted would require. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from vermont seek recognition? mr. welch: to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from vermont is recognized for one minute. mr. welch: i thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, it's been 141 days, that's how long it's been since the house agriculture committee on a bipartisan basis passed the farm bill by a vote of 35-1. that's th
years old, the healthcare law will unfairly stick you with higher premiums. dennis, how is that younger people in this age group are hit harder, or higher premiums? >> so obamacare has new rules going in in 2014, and actturarial firm studied, this and the young will bear a bigger burden of the cost increases. 18 to 24 years old, your premium costs could go up 45% in 2014. 25-29, your premium could go up 35% more. if you're 50, your costs will fall 5%. over 60, down 13%. the elderly healthcare costs are five times to six times as high as a cost for a 20-year-old, yet we're giving them price breaks -- i say them, me -- charging more to younger people, yet older people earn far more. >> greta: if i was 18 or 19 years old, i wish, why in the world would i buy healthcare? because i can pay the penalty of about $700, and should i get sick i can always go out and buy insurance because i can get it for a pre-existing problem. >> exactly. >> greta: and if i don't buy into that pool, that reduces the entire pool to keep the cost down for everybody. >> bingo. where he need the young involved in th
raised its head and the super committee deadlocked 6-6 which under the law left the meat cleaver to drop. the budget meat ax to drop. and that's what we're facing. we're facing something that nobody ever intended to go into effect. so how do we get out of this? we have people of goodwill that have to be reasonable and utilize a little commonsense, lessen their partisanship, lessen their ideological rigi rigidity, and that's the atmosphere that we can come together in. now, i want to tell a story and then i'm going to sit down, mr. president. i want to tell you the story about one of the brightest shining moments in government occurred back in 1983 when this senator was air youn was a youn. we were within six months of social security running out of money. and two old irishmen -- one who was president, his name was reagan; and the other one who was speaker, and his name was o'neill -- decided that they were going to do something about this. they were reasonable people who could operate in a bipartisan way and a nonideological way. and they said, what we're going to do is take this subject
of the appropriations and budget committee. also joined by georgetown university tax law professor john buckley on how the alternative minimum tax is affecting fiscal negotiations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: 25 days to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do n
with disabilities act. noefrdz i in other words by a u.s. law. >> it's unthinkable that americans could not get over a curb or enter a school building or watch a debate if they were in a wheelchair. >> that's why a veteran comes back to the senate on an early december day because it matters. >> despite those pleas from two former presidential nominees, just eight republican senators voted to ratify the treaty sending it down in defeat. every senator up for re-election in 2014 except susan collins who, by the way, is from a blue state, voted against it. lindsey graham cast a no vote though john mccain was one of the treaty's biggest advocates. kelly ayotte voted for it. mississippi senator thad cochrane voted in favor and then as it was going down switched his vote to no. cochrane up in 2014. mississippi more worried about a primary than a general. this is one of of the saddest days i've seen in almost 28 years in the senate. and it needs to be a wake-up call about a broken institution that's letting down the american people. the g 0 op divide was on full display yesterday in both chambers. so was th
. the loppers are professor senate there is the -- law professor- rory litle: >> it would be great if it would go forward in two weeks but the natural question should the constitution prohibit the banning of same-sex marriage? >> there is a lot of divergence, it is unity. the supreme court job is to grant the -- disunity. would be nice to be able to use that to settle these disputes. >> let us be clear, and so there is no impact on the national situation. >> it would be a legal in california but no impact nationally. pam and the speculation on what the court might do? >> is a real tossup weather there will take the case or not there are arguments on both sides for them to hear the case. or to not hear the case and there will be also looking at the defensive mayor checked. they will decide one or not the other. or they will hear on the defensive marriage act. >> thank you, dan. >> we did see some overcast conditions. and a light drizzle along the coast. with picking up on intensity outside the golden gate bridge. we can see the pavement is wet it has been falling let us get right to with the ra
. right now congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. everybody. so that means 98% of americans, 97% of small businesses wouldn't see their income taxes go up by a single dime, right? because 98% of americans make $250,000 a year or less. 97% of small businesses make $250,000 a year or less. so if you say income taxes don't go up, income above $250,000, the vast majority of americans, they don't see a tax hike. but here's the thing, even the top 2%, even folks who make more than $250,000, they still keep their tax cut on the first $250,000 of income. so it would still be better off for them, too, for us to go ahead and get that done. families would have a sense of security going into the new year. companies like this one would know what to expect in terms of planning for next year and the year after. that means people's jobs would be secure. the sooner congress gets this done, the sooner our economy will get a boost. and it would then give us in washington more time to work together on that long range plan to bring down deficit
-raisers. >>> federal judge temporarily blocks federal law, banning the use of conversion therapy. his ruling applies to only three providers who want the law overturned. the therapy is aimed at helping change a minor sexual orientation from gay to straight. >>> 13 people dead, 32 wounded. now the judge in the case has been removed. u.s. court of appeals for the armed services says the judge showed bias when he ordered h hasan be forcibly shaved before his court-martial. hasasm n argued that he grew a beard in accordance with his muslim faith and the order violated his religious freedom. with the san antonio express news, joining us this morning. welcome. >> thank you. >> i thought it was against army regulations to have facial hair. >> it generally is. the regulation is so strict, in fact, that most of the people i've known in the military don't even wear mustaches. and when they did, they were in the war zone. for example, invasion of iraq, one of my buddies wore a pretty thick mustache. that was out of regulation but no one cares when you're in the war zone. at fd hood, that's a different matter.
. >> i received advice what the australian broadcasters did. they may well have broken the law. on the other hand, they've apologized for it. so we're going to have a long and careful think about what, if anything, we do. >> reporter: prince william visited his wife for a third day, again looking relaxed. kate is improving, but it's not known when she will be able to leave hospital. it is said she may take a few days to recover from this acute morning sickness from which she's been suffering. keir simmons, nbc news, london. >>> coming up at 4:30, we'll have more on the severe morning sickness that landed kate in the hospital. a woman who suffered from the same condition explains just how debilitating it was. >>> virginia state police and the fbi have now joined an investigation into the bombing of an atm in fredericksburg. detectives tell us there was an explosion around 4:00 this morning here at the virginia credit union on gordon shelton boulevard. the outdoor atm was damaged but no money was taken. the credit union was open for business today. no other explosives were found.
is live in tysons tonight on why there is a push to change the laws in the commonwealth. >> reporter: well, wendy, this is an issue we all can relate to. the urge to send a text or answer a message while driving. here in the commonwealth of virginia, some say it's hit a point that's simply unacceptable. you don't have to be out on the roads long to see it. drivers texting. some even cruising down the interstate at high speeds. we saw this driver rolling along at 60 miles per hour today. he just kept rolling, and rolling, and about 20 seconds later put down the phone. it makes some people downright angry. >> i understand we're in a world that's kind of an accepted practice. but i think people need to stop and realize how dangerous that is to themselves and other drivers. >> it's a huge hazard. it's very dangerous. and it costs lives. >> reporter: here in virginia, a number of bills are being drawn up that would make the penalties for texting and driving tougher. the problem is that in the commonwealth, texting and driving is a secondary offense, meaning you can't pulled over just for textin
worked in law for 40 years in government and politics and a trust fund is a fiduciary responsibility, which means they can't mess with it. just like if you have a lawyer and you created a trust for your child, that lawyer cannot say, oh, i want that money. that's mine. i just wrote a letter to the president in response to a survey, they were talking about the social security. i said, look, this is a trust fund. we can get a class action of everybody who paid into it, and sue the federal government. let's see what happens. >> stephanie: yeah, yeah. >> caller: because we had no choice of them taking out deductions from our pay. >> stephanie: that's right. >> caller: social security, medicare. >> stephanie: no, i know. >> caller: we're still paying for it. >> stephanie: a lot of people have said this but i wish we could change the name of it from entitlement forever. >> caller: i don't like that entitlement crap. >> stephanie: it's our money. >> caller: it sounds like some beggars. >> just a bunch of freeloaders getting free crap. >> stephanie: we can't afford this. like we're a bunch o
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